HOME
BLOG
LIBRARY
JUKEBOX
PUBLICAN'S PERCH
COCKTAILS
CONTACT US
     A RAMBLE DOWN RACE STREET
small white logo
CHRIS POH
Much of the architectural splendor of Jim Thorpe can be attributed to the efforts and money of Asa Packer. By the mid 1800s he had amassed an estate worth $54 million dollars. By the current measure of purchasing power that would be equivalent to approximately $1.25 billion dollars. Like most of the industrial titans of the day he used a portion of that wealth to improve his own backyard. Today that would mean a private island in the Caribbean or a remote compound in Wyoming. During the 19th century it meant building the houses and structures that served the needs of your workers and their families. Unfortunately much of this construction was not the result of largess or liberality; but instead it came about as part of that unique form of indentured servitude instituted by the Robber Barons against the working class.





Race Street in Jim Thorpe as seen in American Public House Review
RACE STREET IN JIM THORPE




This was not the case though with Asa Packer. Those structures which became part of his legacy, including Lehigh University, are a testament to a man of high integrity who sought only the betterment of his community and the nurturing of his fellowman.

Along Race Street just beyond St. Mark’s Episcopal Church stands a row of sixteen three story buildings. These dwellings, which may have been inspired by Philadelphia’s historic Elfreth’s Alley, are reminiscent of those quiet charming neighborhoods common to Quebec, Dublin or Edinburgh. Packer constructed these homes for the engineers and foreman of the Lehigh Valley Railroad.

Nestled amongst the structures of Stone Row is the BLACK BREAD CAFE. On the second floor of this fine dining establishment is an inviting hideaway that offers excellent libations in an atmosphere that is warm, stylish and comfortable. Owners Robert and Debbie Dynan have created a space that is in harmony with the historic character of the building.



Black Bread Cafe as seen in American Public House Review
THE BLACK BREAD CAFE


Black Bread Cafe Bar Painting as seen in American Public House Review
FUN AND FRIENDLY


Asa Packer was a capitalist, philanthropist, and statesman; but at the core of his being was the soul of a precise and gifted carpenter, a man who with his own hands built houses and canal boats. The harvest of his vision, business acumen and physical skills continue to be the heart of this community. His spirit begs our perambulations, and no turn of the town would be complete without a ramble down Race Street. And once you’ve gone that far - I highly recommend an ascent of the stairs at the BLACK BREAD CAFE.





The bar at the Black Bread Cafe as seen in American Public House Review
THE COZY BAR AT THE BLACK BREAD CAFE






Black Bread Cafe is now under new ownership. Now operates as

STONE ROW

(570) 732-0465




                                                                              
GLASSES RAISED                                         SPIRITS LIFTED                                         JOURNEYS SHARED
HOME
BLOG
LIBRARY
JUKEBOX
PUBLICAN'S PERCH
COCKTAILS
CONTACT US